Precision Street Rods & Machines - Building Quality Cars Since 1982
 
Precision Street Rods & Machines 
"How we installed a 4-Link Suspension in Steve Borow's '70 Z28 Camaro" 
 
 
We will be up dating Steve Borow's 1970 Z28 Camaro by installing Detroit Speed's rear QuadraLink kit. Detroit Speed has designed a QuadraLink suspension system that is state-of-the-art and will allow a second generation Camaro like Steve's to handle extremely well on the street or the track. This system features a short and long arm four-link setup that is used in conjunction with coilover shocks and a panhard bar to center the differential. The complete kit comes with all of the brackets and comprehensive installation instructions including templates for locating the brackets. The differential used for this kit is a strong Ford 9-inch that comes equipped with the brackets installed.
 
 
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Photo 1
Photo 1
Photo 1: The Detroit Speed QuadraLink kit comes with brackets installed on the Ford 9-inch axle housing, four bars, a panhard bar, high quality coil-over shocks, hardware, and a complete installation instruction sheet that includes templates for locating the parts and the modifications required.
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Photo 2
Photo 2: Looking under the car you can see the Chevy differential riding on stock parallel leaf springs. The original rear sway bar was missing; however it did come with one from the factory.
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Photo 3: After the gas tank mounting straps were disconnected, the gas tank was carefully removed from the car. This gas tank will be reinstalled after the QuadraLink suspension installation
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Photo 4: We used a screwdriver to pry off the e-brake cable clips. We slipped the cables out of the brackets and moved the cables out of the way. This way they don’t interfere when installing the new suspension.
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Photo 5
Photo 5: The first thing we did to get this project going was to support both the rear axle and the rear of the car with jack stands. The front end of the spring ride in a bracket that bolts to the chassis. The bracket bolts were removed from the chassis on both sides of the car.
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Photo 6
Photo 6: The spring bolts were disconnected from the shackles using an open-end wrench and a socket wrench.
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Photo 7
Photo 7: The rear differential was removed from the car as a complete unit with springs and e-brake cables still attached.
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Photo 8
Photos 8 & 9: In order to keep the chassis from moving during the reconstruction process, the rear frame rails were connected to the rack by welding two angle iron braces in place.
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Photo 9
Photo 10
Photo 10
Photo 10: Here is a look at the inner wheel well housing and chassis before any work was done. The factory wheel well housing will need to be removed in order to install larger tires. Detroit Speed offers a 2-inch wider wheel well housing that we will be installing later.
Photo 11
Photo 11
Photo 11:The wheel welll housing was carefully removed from the car by using a three-inch cut-off wheel,
Photo 12
Photo 12
Photo 12: Here is the rear frame section after the wheel well housing was removed. The small bracket seen in the photo will have to be removed.
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Photo 13: This is how the rear frame looked after the small bracket was removed and the area ground smooth.
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Photo 14: There is another small bracket located on the inside of the frame. It was also cut off and the area ground smooth..
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Photos 15 & 16: There is an e-brake cable brachet located on the inside of the frame that needs to be removed as well. It was cut off and ground smooth just as the others were.
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Photo 17: The installation instructions include templates that make it easier to figure out where modifications have to be made.
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Photo 18: This template shows where a notch in the frame will have to be made. The same template will be used on the other side. Markings were made for the notches.
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Photo 19
Photo 19: Here is one of the templates taped in place. The frame section will have to be narrowed to where the template ends. Since this much frame strength will be temporarily removed, it was a good idea to support the rear of the car as we did.
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Photo 20
Photo 20: Using another supplied template, the rear floor section was marked and cut accordingly.
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Photo 21: This small notch and slice was made using a three-inch cut-off wheel.
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Photo 22
Photo 22: Previously we showed you in photo 18 where a notch has to be made in the frame. We used a three-inch cut-off wheel once again.
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Photo 23
Photo 23: We used a 3-inch cut-off wheel to trim the rear frame rails to match our template markings. This was followed by a 3-inch grinder to make all edges smooth and clean the surface for future welding.
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Photo 24
Photo 24: This area of the car was damaged in the past. We decided to modify the bolt- in bracket that was furnished in the kit to make sure the installation was stronger. These brackets will be welded into the chassis instead of bolted in.
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Photo 25: This is the rear bracket that is furnished in the Detroit Speed kit. This bracket is designed to bolt to the spring pocket holes.
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Photo 26
Photo 26: Since the area around the front spring pocket was damaged, we added additional material to the Detroit Speed bracket to make it larger. We intend on welding it in place instead of bolting it in.This insures us that the bracket will weld to the frame and floor pan where the metal is good and strong. Here is the modified bracket after the additional material was added.
Photo 27
Photo 27
Photo 27: The frame has to be narrowed slightly for the botttom four-link bar to clear. Detroit Speed furnishes boxing plates where the frame has to be modified. There is one for each side of the frame.
Photo 28
Photo 28
Photo 28: We welded and ground the mfg. notch smooth prior to installing them.
Photo 29
Photo 29
Photo 29: Here is the frame after a section was cut out for four-link clearance. As before, we cleaned up any rough edges and cleaned the metal surface where we will be welding using a 3-inch grinder.
Photo 30
Photo 30
Photo 30: The boxing plate was placed against the frame and held in place with Vise-Grip clamps. Some small adjustment had to be made to get it sitting exactly where we wanted it. Notice that the four-link bracket is also held in place.
Photo 31
Photo 31
Photo 31: After the frame patch and four-link bracket were in place, we welded them to the frame using a MIG welder. This can also be done with a TIG welder if you have one.
Photo 32
Photo 32
Photo 32: The same brackets and frame patches in photo 31 that were protruding through the top side of the floor were also welded for superior strength.
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Photo 33
Photo 33: Here is the floor section after the welding was finished. The welds will be sanded for a nice smooth finish even though it will never be seen after the seat is in place.
Photo 34
Photo 34
Photo 34: This is what the frame section looked like after the frame patch was welded in. As before, the welds were ground smooth.
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Photo 35: Here is the other side of the car with the patch in place. This provides another look at how the frame was notched to clear the long four-link bar.
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Photo 36
Photos 36 & 37: Here is a close look at the four-link bracket welded into the chassis. The instructions want you to bolt the bracket to the frame rails. We chose to plug weld and weld the perimeter for a stronger attachment.
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Photo 37
Photo 37: We groung the plug welds smooth for a better / cleaner look.
Photo 38
Photo 38
Photos 38 & 39: When the measurement has been double checked and the installer at Precision Street Rods was confident that the template was in the correct location, the perimeter of the template was marked on the frame.
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Photo 40
Photo 40
Photo 40: Templates were used to locate and show us where to trim the upper four-link attachment brackets at the floor pan.
Photo 41
Photo 41
Photos 41 & 42: The floor pan was marked with a silver pencil, then the area was cut out with a three-inch cut-off wheel. The frame notch was also cut out accordingly.
Photo 42
Photo 42
Photo 43
Photo 43
Photo 43: Here is the upper floor pan and the frame section after the cuts have been made. The bracket that was supplied will connect to these points.
Photo 44
Photo 44
Photo 44: The “U-Shaped” bracket supplied in the kit was held in place by using a Vise-Grip. Next, it was welded in place. Again all of the welds were ground smooth.
Photo 45
Photo 45
Photos 45 & 46: We trial fit the upper link mount pocket making sure it lines up properly with the other suspension mounting points. We tack welded the mounting pocket in place. Detroit Speed makes an outer framework for the pocket. We held it in place and marked the portion of the pocket that protrudes past the framework. It will need to be trimmed flush to the framework.
Photo 46
Photo 46
Photo 47
Photo 47
Photo 47: We tack welded the four-link pocket to the framework bracket. The bracket was removed from the car so the framework could be welded on from the front and backside. This double sided welding provides more penetration and allows for some smoothing on the side that can be seen.
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Photo 48
Photo 48: After the welding was completed, the bracket was placed back into the car and it was welded to the floor pan. Again this bracket was welded on both sides for maximum strength.
Photo 49
Photo 49
Photo 49: Here is the bracket on the inside of the car. You can see that this side of the bracket was also welded in place. We added the Detroit Speed kit gusset at this time for added strenght.
Photo 50
Photo 50
Photos 50 & 51: The entire unit including the panhard bar bracket was welded in place. Notice that the bracket has two holes so the panhard bar can be adjusted accordingly to the selected ride height.
Photo 51
Photo 51
Photo 51: This is how the outside of the frame looked after the bracket was welded in.
Photo 52
Photo 52
Photo 52: Detroit Speed wants to have an additional gusset welded to the upper four-bar pocket from the outside.
Photo 53
Photo 53
Photos 53 & 54: Detroit Speed provides a panhard bracket brace that also strengthens the rear frame section. This bar runs from one side of rear frame to the other.
Photo 54
Photo 54
Photo 55
Photo 55
Photo 55: Detroit Speed supplies a frame panhard brace. It will be welded to the trunk floor and the inside frame rails.
Photo 56
Photo 56
Photo 56: First thing we did was to installed / weld the panhard brace to the trunk floor, then to the inner frame rails..
Photo 57
Photo 57
Photo 57: Here is the brace after it was welded in place. You can see that the gas tank strap mounting locations have not been altered so the stock tank can be reinstalled.
Photo 58
Photo 58
Photo 58: After all of the modifications have been completed, the undercarriage was painted simi-flat black.
Photo 59
Photo 59
Photo 59: At this point the wider rear wheel well housings were installed. After the tubs were welded in place, the floor section was coated with gray primer.
Photo 60
Photo 60
Photo 60: The differential was placed under the car and the four-link rods were installed. Here is a close look at the long lower rod hooked to the bracket that was located in the spring pocket location.
Photo 61
Photo 61
Photo 61: Here is the upper four-link rod attached to the floor pocketl and the axle housing. The upper rods are very short but they work well and are fully adjustable.
Photo 62
Photo 62
Photo 62: This is where the Detroit Speed sway bar attached to the frame.
Photo 63
Photo 63
Photo 63: Stepping back you can see the complete differential installation that includes the four-link design, the large strong panhard bar and the top quality coilover shocks that display plenty of adjustability. The differential is a Ford 9-inch with a limited slip unit.
Photo 64
Photo 64
Photo 64: Here is the Camaro after the Detroit Speed kit was installed. You can see that the car has a lower ride height. The wheels shown are just rollers until the new large diameter wheels are installed. This suspension system has been track tested so this car should handle well.
Photo 65
Photo 65
This is how Steve's Camaro looked after we installed larger 18" wheels. The rims are 12" wide.
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