Precision Street Rods & Machines - Building Quality Cars Since 1982
Precision Street Rods & Machines 
"How We Install Electric 2-Speed Wipers" 
 
 
This is how we install 2-speed electric wipers in a 1955 Chevrolet 3100 truck. We will be using Specialty Power Window's universal kit with their made to fit bezels and arms / blades.
 
INSTRUCTIONS: Roll your mouse over the the photo, left side click to view it in a larger format. Use the manual arrow buttons to proceed in either direction. Use the (X) button to return to the original format.
 
OPTION: Click on the bottom left arrow to start the automatic slide show in the larger format, Click it again to pause the show.
 
 
 
Lead Photo
Lead Photo
Finished
Photo 1
Photo 1
Photo 01: The Universal Dual-Wiper kit from Specialty Power Windows employs a cable worm-drive system much like those used in English cars of the ‘50s & ‘60s. The kit features a remote-mounted 2-speed motor with 300 in. lbs. stall torque, two wiper arm drive assemblies with an adjustable sweep, worm-drive cable and housing, your choice of a rocker or rotary switch, wiring, mounting hardware and instructions.
Photo 2
Photo 2
Photos 02 & 03: Since we are installing a Specialty wiper kit in a 1955 Chevrolet truck that came with wipers from the factory, we won’t need to drill access holes for the wiper arm shafts. Simply put, we will remove the factory wiper arm shafts and replace them with the new ones that came in our kit. The stock bezels work perfectly with the SPW kit. If your bezels have windshield washer tubes, they will need to be removed.
Photo 3
Photo 3
Photo 4
Photo 4
Photo 04: With the wiper arm assemblies in place we can begin to assemble the motor and motor transmission together. The parts will be assembled in order from left-to-right.
Photo 5
Photo 5
Photos 05, 06 & 07: The assembly starts off by installing the motor to the motor transmission housing via an adaptor ring. There are three small retaining bolts with washers that secure the housing to the motor. The motor has full rotational adjustment so you can place it where it benefits you the best.
Photo 6
Photo 6
Photo 7
Photo 7
Photo 8
Photo 8
Photo 08: Determining the sweep angle of the wiper blades was next. This is the total angle in degrees that the wiper arm travels from its “Park” position to the point of maximum sweep or travel. The Specialty Power Window’s wiper drive wheel has 8 selections ranging from 90-degrees to 160-degrees. The holes are 10-degrees apart. This allows you to pick the hole that works best for you.
Photo 9
Photo 9
Photos 09, 10 & 11: The drive wheel attaches to the splinted motor shaft via a nut. We will be using the 100-degree setting. The position of the drive wheel hole determines how you want the arms to respond (in-to-out or out-to-in). If it is in the position closest to the cable it will work opposite of the position furthest away or 180-degrees apart.
Photo 10
Photo 10
Photo 11
Photo 11
Photo 12
Photo 12
Photos 12 & 13: With all of this behind us, we can install the transmission housing lid. It is held in place by 4 small machine nuts at the corners. There is a slotted hole for the cable housing to lock into. It is placed toward the end opposite the drive wheel.
Photo 13
Photo 13
Photo 14
Photo 14
Photos 14 & 15: There is a motor assembly mounting plate that comes in the kit. It attaches to the same 4 studs that secure the motor transmission lid to the motor transmission housing.
Photo 15
Photo 15
Photo 16
Photo 16
Photo 16: We will be mounting our motor assembly to the top of the firewall to dash support bracket.
Photo 17
Photo 17
Photos 17 & 18: We made and tack welded 2 angled 14-gauge sheet metal brackets to the motor assembly mounting plates.
Photo 18
Photo 18
Photo 19
Photo 19
Photos 19 & 20: We drilled 4, ¼-inch holes and bolted the remote motor assembly to the firewall to dash bracket.
Photo 20
Photo 20
Photo 21
Photo 21
Photo 21: With everything mounted, all we need to do is make and install the cable housing between the 2 wiper shafts and motor. We started by making wire templates with the bends no tighter than 3-inches or less than 3-inches of straight coming out of the motor assembly.
Photo 22
Photo 22
Photos 22 & 23: You will need access of a tubing bender, tubing cutter and 45-degree flair kit such as the ones shown to get the job done.
Photo 23
Photo 23
Photo 24
Photo 24
Photo 24: Here is a look at how our cable housings after we made them. Notice we have a 3-inch section of straight at the very end. This allows the cable to be housed without protruding through the end when it’s in its maximum travel sequence.
Photo 25
Photo 25
Photos 25 & 26: Now that everything has been made, we can start assembling the pieces together. A modest coat of wheel bearing grease was applied to the lids, all of the moving parts, including the cabling.
Photo 26
Photo 26
Photo 27
Photo 27
Photo 27: The electrical was temporally hooked up and the unit was tested.
Photo 28
Photo 28
Photos 28 & 29: Now we know there isn’t any binding and we know where the park position is, we can go ahead and install the cable linkage. It should be parallel to the cable when it’s in the selected drive wheel hole as shown.
Photo 29
Photo 29
Photo 30
Photo 30
Photo 30: This is how the cable housing connects to the wiper shafts.
Photo 31
Photo 31
Photos 31, 32 & 33: This is where our switch will reside; out of sight for that clean look, yet accessible.
Photo 32
Photo 32
Photo 33
Photo 33
Photo 34
Photo 34
Photo 34: The very last step is to install the wiper arms and blades. Finished!
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint